Functionality, Razer Synapse, and Final Thoughts

Razer Synapse is Razer’s very own customization suite for the bulk of Razer’s products. It is through this free software that you can customize everything that there is to tweak on the Razer Huntsman Elite. Razer Synapse lets you create macros and assign them, as well as lighting conditions, to all of the keys of the keyboard. Even the media dial above the NumPad is subject to customization. All of these customizations can be saved to profiles, which can be set to load up automatically with specific games. Taking that even further, whereas you normally would save your profiles on the cloud via Razer Synapse, you can now also store those profiles offline, right onto the keyboard’s onboard memory.

Having used and reviewed customization suites for other major gaming and non-gaming peripheral vendors, I noticed that Razer Synapse took a slightly different route with their saved profiles. In particular, whereas other customization suites have you create profiles that married key behavior settings with key LED settings, these are somewhat separate with Razer Synapse. Meaning, there are profiles for key configurations and macro settings while lighting options are saved separately as Chroma Studio profiles.

If you wish to have behavior options load up with a specific game, and you want to do the same as well with the LED’s, you would have to define the key profiles and Chroma profiles each time. There are advantages to this as you can have Chroma settings that you realize, down the road, are better for a game for which you already have configurations set. Having Razer Chroma separated like this allows you to apply your more specific color saves to a game’s load up without overwriting the key press and macro configurations at the same time.

Once you got that concept under your belt, Razer Synapse is pretty easy to manage. The macro creator works pretty much like any other, where you can record a set of key strokes, then double back to refine key press timings and delays as needed. Do you have a profile you really like and wish you did not to have to be connected to the Razer Synapse cloud to access it? Well, it is as simple as drag-and-dropping the profile to one of four onboard memory slots. Chroma Studio took a smidgen of time to get accustomed to. However, once you get a feel for the lighting options available as well as how you wanted the lights to display, it was as simple as “painting” keys and LED’s with your favorite colors and effects.

All in all, the Razer Huntsman Elite is the slam dunk of keyboards for anyone looking for excellent performance and feel, backed by loads of functionality. Here you have a keyboard that is a dream to use and a joy to look at. Its aluminum top plate and threaded cabling ensures that the keyboard is both sturdy and snag-free. The Razer’s Opto-Mechanical Switches were the surprise I was looking for when we first say this at E3. You have excellent comfort with both key-pressing and wrist-resting. Most importantly, key press actuation is on point and never falters, which is what you should expect from a $200 keyboard.

Ultimately, the Razer Huntsman Elite is the luxury gaming product that is deserving of your $200. Through Razer Synapse, you have a world of customization at your fingertips. Even if customizations, a luxurious feel with that wrist rest, or additional features is more than you care about, the Razer Huntsman Elite is still a win in its build quality alone. If you’re looking for a top-of-the-line keyboard in 2018, the Razer Huntsman Elite is definitely worth your time.

Check out the Razer Huntsman Elite gaming keyboard for yourself here.

 

If you were more taken by Razer’s Opto-Mechanical Switches more than the wrist rest, additional features and lighting options, and you want to shave off $50 from the price, you could also always check out the Razer Huntsman here.

 

† Razer Huntsman Elite review unit provided by Razer PR for review.

Double-Jump

Double-Jump spends his day double-jumping over users' IT HelpDesk requests so that he has more time to double-jump in games. He enjoys double-jumping in PC, console and mobile games. His element resides mainly in Shooters, RPGs, and Fighters with a hint of the miscellaneous. The only time he sits still is when he gets his hands on a gadget.