Game Review

I Crowneth Thee, Lord of Chickens – Fable III Review

Fable III

Fable III

If you play the game, you’ll get the reference, I promise…

Ever wished you could dress up like Paul Revere and shoot fireballs at wolves, bats, bandits or townspeople? If you did, then you have some problems and people fear you for non-intimidating reasons. You should hire some professional to listen to your rants. But if that’s a little over your budget, then you should definitely get Fable III. Fable is back, corralling all of the Fable fanatics and correcting all of misdeeds from Fable II.

All of the Fable II basics are still here. You control your destiny and story through your actions and decisions within the vast Fable III world. You have three basic forms of attack: melee, gun-toting, and magic. The play-out of all three is extremely immersive and stylish. The game zooms in during your more crushing impacts, just in case you wanted to add ‘pretending-to-be-a-Spartan-from-300’ to your list of problems mentioned earlier. Your character even pulls behind-the-back shots for those cases where you were “forgetting someone.” And you’ll be amazed at the beauty of the magic you cast upon your enemies as you burn them until they transform into skeletons. You can still purchase shops and houses to help you make money as you go off on your killing rampage. When you’re tired of that, you can make money the hard way by taking a spin at the job market. (I’m a 5-star lute player myself – Thinking about going on tour next week… Roadies needed!)

Now the new additions are the main reason why you will find yourself playing until 3 am. Fable gives you the best story it has ever offered. You’re pulled into an epic tale of revolution against the corrupt king and you’re accompanied with great voice acting from John Cleese, Simon Pegg, Michael Fassbender, and Sir Ben Kingsley. The story is as dramatic as it is hilarious.

Now that you’re sucked into the story, you’re too cool for menu screens. Fable 3 uses a unique in-person menu (“Sanctuary”) where you control how your character looks and plays. Put on a ridiculous ensemble just to have John Cleese make fun of you. Hate walking? Control your own pace. Through the use of the “Sanctuary” map, you’re able to dart to where ever you need to be. Even the character’s progression is displayed and controlled through the new symbolic and artistic “Road to Rule”. Tired of burning or zapping your opponents? Fable III let’s you combine the elements in more than 10 combinations, letting you customize the new personal hell you put your enemies through.

Those of you that played Fable II’s multiplayer might agree that it left much to be desired. The person that joins your game became a sort of a “hand-me-down” character. You have to strip down your awesomeness just to have someone to play with you and think about how cool they could have been.

Not anymore.

Fable III completely overhauls the multiplayer by giving people the freedom they’ve always wanted. You can now join another player’s game as your own unique character, with your own screen, and no limits to how far you are allowed to follow or stray from them. Both players have so much freedom that they can even get into “relations” with each other or share businesses with one another.

This is how Fable (especially II) was meant to be played: an even more thrilling story-line, colorful characters, polished battle system, and a now intuitive multiplayer experience. Even if you can afford that psychiatrist to help you with your desire to burn people, buy or at least Game-Fly this game.